Shewey’s Chironomid Emerger (Variant)

Shewey's Chironomid Emerger

Hook: Tiemco 200R 14-18
Rib: Silver wire
Body: Hemingway’s Hare’s Dubbing Plus UV, black
Hackle: Badger
Gills: 3/32 foam cylinder
Thread: Danville 6/0 black

The original is a pattern devised by John Shewey, Editor-in-Chief of the US Northwest Fly Fishing family of magazines. It already had elements of the classic suspender buzzer pattern, I rather like the addition of the hackle, the original used a peacock thorax and grizzly hackle, I’ve used a badger.

Brahma Bugger

Brahma Bugger

IG190206-222718A fly designed by US fly fisher Tim Flager, as a cold water trout fly to imitate sculpin and other small fish. The original Woolly Bugger is believed to have been created by Pennsylvania fly tyer Russell Blessing as early as 1967 to resemble a hellgrammite nymph, its precise origin is unknown, but is clearly an evolution of the Wooly Worm fly, which itself is a variation—intentional or not—of the original palmer fly, which dates back to Walton and beyond!

Hook: Kamasan B830#10
Tail: Brahma hen Chickabou
Body: Brahma hen hackles, natural
Thread: Danville 6/0

Denson’s General Purpose Daddy

Denson's General Purpose Daddy

Hook: Tiemco TMC100BL #10
Rib: Gold wire
Body: Blend of Natural Hare/Squirrel 50/50 mix with pearl ice dub
Body hackle: Grizzly hen dyed golden olive
Wings: Cree Cock
Legs: Knotted pheasant tail
Shoulder hackle: Grizzly hen dyed golden olive
Thread: Danville 6/0 brown olive

A straight copy of Rob Denson’s pattern, though my choice of materials and orientation of the fly in the photograph certainly seems to accentuate the olive colouring more than in Rob Denson’s original. I really like the simplicity of this Daddy pattern, there have been some truly wonderful and complex patterns published over the years for a fly that is a staple for the tail end of the season. With plenty of bulk there’s lots of material to keep it afloat or it would be relatively easy to sink into the surface film.

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Durham Ranger

Durham Ranger

Hook: Hayabusa 761 black nickel #10
Tag: Yellow floss
Butt: Peacock Herl
Rib: Oval gold tinsel
Body: Claret floss
Wing: Pair of tippet with Jungle Cock each side
Throat: Claret hackle fibres
Thread: Danville 6/0 black

Start of a journey to tying more complex flies. Eventually, I aim to tie classic Atlantic salmon flies but that’s some way down the road. To start, the opposite page in Ken Sawada’s Wet Flies to the Colonel Downman’s Fancy that I posted earlier has a wet fly interpretation of the classic Durham Ranger salmon fly.

Kingsmill (Variant)

 

Kingsmill (Variant)

Hook: Hayabusa 373
Tail: Golden Pheasant Crest
Butt: Blue tinsel sealed with UV resin
Rib: Oval Siver tinsel
Body: Peacock Herl dyed black
Hackle: Black hen
Wing
: Turkey Quill dyed black
Topping: Golden Pheasant Crest
Cheeks: Jungle cock splits
Thread: Danvilles 6/0

Quite a few things to work on with this pattern – cheeks are too large, wing has split but reason for tying it was to have a go at adding Golden Pheasant topping to a fly.

Ace of Hearts

Ace of Hearts

Hook: Hayabusa 761
Rib: Oval silver tinsel
Body: Red tying thread
Wing: Black marabou
Overwing: Bronze Mallard
Throat: Guinea Fowl
Cheeks: Jungle cock splits
Thread: Danvilles 6/0

A pattern I came across on Caithness Quality Flies’ website. A “McConn’s Ace of Spades” variant. However, other than that, I can’t find much about the origin of these “Cormorant-like” Ace of Spades or “Ace of Spades-like” Cormorants other than occasional references to them, mainly in Scotland. They’re certainly different to Dave Collyer’s original.